Tumblelog by Soup.io
Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

Cannabis could have an amazing effect on your brain


It has long been proven that cannabis can have an analgesic effect in diseases such as multiple sclerosis or rheumatism.

That is why seriously ill people have been able to obtain cannabis on prescription without any problems in Germany since March.

But it should not only help with pain. It might also have amazing effects on the brain of old people. A group of researchers at the University of Bonn has now published a study in the journal "Nature Medicine" in which mice were given tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) - the main active substance of cannabis - in small doses.

Improved brain performance in old mice

The result: The cognitive abilities of the older mice, which were between 12 and 18 months old, improved much better, just like in younger animals. Neuroscientist and co-author of the study Andreas Zimmer explained: "Suddenly the old animals behave like the young ones. We can no longer distinguish an animal that is one and a half years old from a young mouse".

As reported by "Die Welt", the research team from Bonn has been working for 15 years on the investigation of the receptors of mice on which cannabis has an effect - the so-called endocannabinoid system.

Since the activity of this system decreases with increasing age, this part of the nervous system has a considerable influence on all ageing processes and hence also on cognitive abilities.
Cannabis might help against incipient dementia

In an old people's home in Israel there were already first tests, which apparently confirmed the results with the mice. Seniors suffering from sleep disorders and loss of appetite were given cannabis. "Many of them became much more mentally active as a result," Zimmer said.

Read also: Study: Intelligent people take cannabis, drink alcohol and give up cigarettes

That is why the Bonn researchers intend to start a new clinical study this year, in which the effects of THC on brain function in elderly people with beginning Alzheimer's dementia or mild senile dementia will be investigated.

"In this context we know that practically everything that works in the mouse also works in humans. I am therefore cautiously optimistic that the results might be transferable," said Zimmer.

That is why the Bonn researchers intend to start a new clinical study this year, in which the effects of THC on brain function in elderly people with beginning Alzheimer's dementia or mild senile dementia will be investigated.

"In this context we know that practically everything that works in the mouse also works in humans. I am therefore cautiously optimistic that the results might be transferable," said Zimmer.

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl